Do you understand the definition of financial aid?

 
Do you understand the definition of financial aid?The term “financial aid” goes hand in hand with paying for college. But it can mean different things to different people, and often the term is used in various ways, even by colleges.

 
“Financial aid” is money that can help students pay for college. Many people think of student loans when they hear the term financial aid, but loans are just one part. In addition to loans, financial aid includes scholarships, grants, and work-study jobs. Scholarships and grants are gifts; they do not need to be repaid. Loans, on the other hand, have to be repaid with interest, while work-study jobs are a work obligation for the student. Aid can be need-based or non-need-based, though most people think of financial aid as being strictly need-based.

 
Loans. The main sources of loans are the federal government and private lenders. Students with the greatest financial need are eligible for the government’s subsidized Stafford Loan and Perkins Loan (“subsidized” means Uncle Sam pays the interest while the student is in school and during certain other periods); all students are eligible for the government’s unsubsidized Stafford Loan. The loan amounts are capped each year.

 
For parents, the government offers PLUS Loans, which let parents borrow up to the full cost of their child’s education. Private lenders also offer student loans and parent loans. Generally, the government offers more favorable loan repayment options than private lenders, most notably several income-sensitive repayment options.

 
Grants & scholarships. Though students with the greatest financial need typically qualify for a federal Pell Grant, the main source of grants and scholarships for the majority of students is colleges. College grants and scholarships can be based on financial need (as determined by the college’s own aid form) or on merit, whether academic, athletic, or some other talent. Colleges vary widely in the type (need-based or merit-based) and amount of grants and scholarships they offer. As your family researches college options, exploring these differences is probably the single biggest thing you can do to optimize your bottom line.

 
Work-study jobs. The government underwrites work-study jobs for the neediest students, but colleges may also offer campus jobs that are not necessarily based on need.

 

When do I need to submit college financial aid forms?

 
When do I need to submit college financial aid forms?It depends on the form you’re filling out and whether your child is a new college student or a returning student.

 
College deadlines for the federal government’s financial aid form, the FAFSA, might be anywhere from February 1 to April 1 for both new and returning students. But it’s in your best interest to submit the FAFSA as soon after January 1 as possible (it can’t be submitted before January 1) because some government aid programs operate on a first-come, first-served basis.

 
The FAFSA relies on tax information from the previous year, so it’s helpful to have your tax return already completed. However, if you don’t, you can still file the FAFSA using estimated numbers and then go back later and update your FAFSA with final tax numbers once you’ve completed your tax return (the government offers an online tool–the IRS Data Retrieval Tool–that allows you to import your tax information directly into your FAFSA). The FAFSA captures two data points: the financial picture of both the parent(s) and the student for the previous year.

 
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All About IPOs

 
All About IPOsMaybe you’ve heard someone talking about investing in “a hot new IPO” and wondered what all the fuss was about. Or maybe you’ve heard about a company “going public” and thought about whether you should invest in it. If you’re unfamiliar with initial public offerings (IPOs), here’s a review of some basics.

 

What is an IPO?

 
As the name implies, an initial public offering represents the first time a company issues shares of stock that are available for purchase by the public (in other words, when it “goes public”). The sale of the company’s stock is typically intended to attract new capital that the company can use to expand. IPOs might be considered the rock stars of the investing world; when the company has generated a lot of interest leading up to its IPO, the initial response from investors can make headlines.

 
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No Matter What Your Age, Your Social Security Statement Matters

 
No Matter What Your Age, Your Social Security Statement MattersFifteen years ago, the Social Security Administration (SSA) launched the Social Security Statement, a tool to help Americans understand the features and benefits that Social Security offers. Since then, millions of Americans have reviewed their personalized statements to see a detailed record of their earnings, as well as estimates of retirement, survivor, and disability benefits based on those earnings. Here’s how to get a copy of your statement, and why it deserves more than just a quick glance, even if you’re years away from retirement.

 

How do you get your statement?

 
In September 2014, the SSA began mailing Social Security Statements to most workers every five years. Workers attaining ages 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 who are not receiving Social Security benefits and are not registered for an online account will receive a statement in the mail about three months before their next birthday. Workers older than age 60 will receive a statement every year.

 
But why wait? A more convenient way to view your Social Security Statement is online. First, visit socialsecurity.gov to sign up for a personal my Social Security account (you must be 18 or older to sign up online). Once you have an account, you can view your Social Security Statement anytime you want, as often as you want.

 
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Healthy Resolutions Can Pay Off (Literally)

 
Healthy Resolutions Can Pay Off (Literally)If you made a New Year’s Resolution to get healthy, you may get more bang for your resolution buck than you bargained for. That’s because healthy habits can benefit your wallet as well as your body.

 

 

The link between health and money

 
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chronic conditions–including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer–account for more than 75% of all health-care costs nationwide. Nearly half of all Americans have a chronic disease, which can lead to other problems that are devastating not just to health but also to a family’s finances. People with a chronic condition pay five times more for health care each year, on average, as those without a chronic disease.*

 
Many chronic diseases can be linked to four behaviors: tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, poor eating habits, and inactivity.* A closer look at each of these behaviors demonstrates the health-money connection.

 
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