What is a college income-share agreement?

 
What is a college income-share agreement?A college income-share agreement, or ISA, is a contract between a student and a college where a student receives education funding from the college today in exchange for agreeing to pay a percentage of future earnings to the college for a specified period of time after graduation. The idea behind ISAs is to minimize the need for private student loans, to give colleges a stake in their students’ outcomes, and to give students the flexibility to pursue careers in lower-paying fields.
 
Purdue University was the first college to introduce such a program in 2016. Under Purdue’s ISA program, students who exhaust federal loans can fund their education by paying back a share of their future income, typically between 3% to 4% for up to 10 years after graduation, with repayment capped at 2.5 times the initial funding amount.1 Continue reading

How to Recover from a Mid-Life Financial Crisis

 
How to Recover from a Mid-Life Financial CrisisA financial crisis can be scary at any age, but this is especially true when you’re in your 40s or 50s. Perhaps you’re way behind on saving for retirement or have too much debt from unnecessary spending. Or maybe an unexpected challenge, such as a job loss, illness, or break from the workforce for caregiving responsibilities, took a direct hit on your finances.
 

Regardless of how you got to this point, it’s important to develop a strategy that will help you re-establish financial stability.
 

Regain control

 

Start by accepting the reality of your situation. This may be easier said than done when you’d rather avoid the anxiety, stress, and guilt that you may feel when you have money issues. It’s okay to feel these negative emotions as part of the recovery process. They are likely to pass with time as you come up with a plan to regain control. Continue reading

How Does the Federal Reserve Affect the Economy?

 
How Does the Federal Reserve Affect the Economy?If you follow financial news, you’ve probably heard many references to “the Fed” along the lines of “the Fed held interest rates,” or “market watchers are wondering what the Fed will do next.” So what exactly is the Fed and what does it do?
 

What is the Federal Reserve?

 
The Federal Reserve — or “the Fed” as it’s commonly called — is the central bank of the United States. The Fed was created in 1913 to provide the nation with a safer, more flexible, and more stable monetary and financial system.
 
Today, the Federal Reserve’s responsibilities fall into four general areas: Continue reading

Mergers & Acquisitions: What’s in the Deal for Investors?

 
Mergers & Acquisitions: What's in the Deal for Investors? Merger and acquisition (M&A) activity in North America and Europe reached its second highest level on record in 2018. There were 19,501 deals worth $3.6 trillion — a 6.3% increase in deal volume over 2017. There was also a rise in mega deals exceeding $10 billion.1
 
Collectively, U.S. corporations had plenty of cash to spend after a long string of solid profits and a significant tax cut.2 High stock prices also provided plenty of equity for deals involving the exchange of stock, while relatively-low borrowing costs made it possible to finance acquisitions. Continue reading

How do I replace my Social Security card?

 
How do I replace my Social Security card?Chances are, you probably have your Social Security number memorized, so you may not have had to use your card in awhile. However, there are times when you may be required to show your actual card, such as when you start a new job or need to access certain government services. Fortunately, replacing a lost or stolen card is a relatively easy process.
 
In order to obtain a new card, you need to prove your citizenship or lawful noncitizen status, and your age and identity from a list of approved documentation (e.g., U.S. passport, driver’s license, birth certificate). All documentation provided must be either original or in certified form (notarized copies or photocopies will not be accepted). Continue reading

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