Taxes

Top Financial Concerns of Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and Millennials

 
Top Financial Concerns of Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and MillennialsMany differences exist among baby boomers, Generation Xers, and millennials. But one thing that brings all three generations together is a concern about their financial situations.
 
According to an April 2016 employee financial wellness survey, 38% of boomers, 46% of Gen Xers, and 51% of millennials said that financial matters are the top cause of stress in their lives. In fact, baby boomers (50%), Gen Xers (56%), and millennials (60%) share the same top financial concern about not having enough emergency savings for unexpected expenses. Following are additional financial concerns for each group and some tips on how to address them.
 

Baby boomers

 
Baby boomers cite retirement as a top concern, with 45% of the group saying they worry about not being able to retire when they want to. Although 79% of the baby boomers said they are currently saving for retirement, 52% of the same group believe they will have to delay retirement. Health issues (30%) and health-care costs (38%) are some of the biggest retirement concerns cited by baby boomers. As a result, many baby boomers (23%) are delaying retirement in order to retain their current health-care benefits.
 
Other reasons reported by baby boomers for delaying retirement include not having enough money saved to retire (48%), not wanting to retire (27%), and having too much debt (23%).
 
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Ten Year-End Tax Tips for 2016

 
Ten Year-End Tax Tips for 2016Here are 10 things to consider as you weigh potential tax moves between now and the end of the year.
 

1. Set aside time to plan

 
Effective planning requires that you have a good understanding of your current tax situation, as well as a reasonable estimate of how your circumstances might change next year. There’s a real opportunity for tax savings if you’ll be paying taxes at a lower rate in one year than in the other. However, the window for most tax-saving moves closes on December 31, so don’t procrastinate.
 

2. Defer income to next year

 
Consider opportunities to defer income to 2017, particularly if you think you may be in a lower tax bracket then. For example, you may be able to defer a year-end bonus or delay the collection of business debts, rents, and payments for services. Doing so may enable you to postpone payment of tax on the income until next year.
 
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2015 Year-End Tax Planning Basics

 
2015 Year-End Tax Planning BasicsAs the end of the 2015 tax year approaches, set aside some time to evaluate your situation and consider potential opportunities. Effective year-end planning depends on a good understanding of both your current circumstances and how those circumstances might change next year.

 

Basic strategies

 
Consider whether there’s an opportunity to defer income to 2016. For example, you might be able to defer a year-end bonus or delay the collection of business debts, rents, and payments for services. When you defer income to 2016, you postpone payment of the tax on that income. And if there’s a chance that you might be paying taxes at a lower rate next year (for example, if you know that you’ll have less taxable income next year), deferring income might mean payingless tax on the deferred income.

 
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Taxes, Retirement, and Timing Social Security

 
Taxes, Retirement, and Timing Social SecurityThe advantages of tax deferral are often emphasized when it comes to saving for retirement. So it might seem like a good idea to hold off on taking taxable distributions from retirement plans for as long as possible. (Note: Required minimum distributions from non-Roth IRAs and qualified retirement plans must generally start at age 70½.) But sometimes it may make more sense to take taxable distributions from retirement plans in the early years of retirement while deferring the start of Social Security retirement benefits.
 

Some basics

 
Up to 50% of your Social Security benefits are taxable if your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) plus one-half of your Social Security benefits falls within the following ranges: $32,000 to $44,000 for married filing jointly; and $25,000 to $34,000 for single, head of household, or married filing separately (if you’ve lived apart all year). Up to 85% of your Social Security benefits are taxable if your MAGI plus one-half of your Social Security benefits exceeds those ranges or if you are married filing separately and lived with your spouse at any time during the year. For this purpose, MAGI means adjusted gross income increased by certain items, such as tax-exempt interest, that are otherwise excluded or deducted from your income for regular income tax purposes.
 
Social Security retirement benefits are reduced if started prior to your full retirement age (FRA) and increased if started after your FRA (up to age 70). FRA ranges from 66 to 67, depending on your year of birth.
 
Distributions from non-Roth IRAs and qualified retirement plans are generally fully taxable unless nondeductible contributions have been made.
 
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I owe a large amount of money to the IRS. Can I pay what I owe in installments?

 

I owe a large amount of money to the IRS. Can I pay what I owe in installments?Unfortunately, not everyone gets a refund during tax season. If you are in the unenviable position of owing a large amount of money to the IRS, you may be able to pay what you owe through an installment agreement with the IRS.

 

With an installment agreement, the amount of your payment will be based on how much you owe in unpaid taxes and your ability to pay that amount within the agreement’s time frame. Although you are generally allowed up to 72 months to pay, your plan may be for a shorter length of time.

 

To request an installment agreement, fill out Form 9465, Installment Agreement Request, and attach it to your tax return, or mail it by itself directly to your designated Internal Revenue Service Center. If your balance due is not more than $50,000, you can apply for an installment agreement online at IRS.gov.

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